Aberfan disaster’s 50th anniversary sees mourning for lost generation

The lives of the 144 people were lost in 1966 when a rock slide hit Pantglas Junior School.

the-mud-and-devastationBut the Welsh disaster at Aberfan wasn’t just about that tiny village, or that one nation – it was a loss for humanity, a generation of children who would never see adulthood, fulfil their potential, live their lives.

Controversy still remains around the National Coal Board – although an inquiry report laid the blame for the disaster squarely with them, no NCB employee or board member was demoted, dismissed, or prosecuted.

But the 50th anniversary was not a time for blame – more a time to look back and remember.

Read my piece on the Mirror here
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Parents share heartache of stillborn babies

For any parent, losing a child is beyond any idea of a worst nightmare.

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But the parents featured in the documentary Still Loved had a special torment, as their little ones were stillborn – and they never even got to tell them they were loved.

The filmmakers are determined to cut through the stigma which faces those who go through the trauma of losing a baby, and the interviews with these heartbroken mums and dads are definitely without any sugar coating.

Read more on the Mirror here
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Norway’s fjords make a picture perfect backdrop

When I got to travel to the Norwegian fjords and call it work, it was a dream come true.

sognefjord-2As a well-worn fan of all things Nordic, I was delighted to have the chance to taste the food and meet the people, all while working out if they would let me move there.

In the event, I was on a cruise, so my brush with Scandi cool was fleeting – but it was definitely enough to keep me hooked.

Read my travel review on the Mirror here
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Blind artist creates incredible dog sculptures

After receiving life-changing brain injuries, Branwyn Owens taught herself how to create blind-artist-creates-incredible-sculptures-for-police-k9-memorialbeautiful work from clay.

She told me “my hands are now my eyes” as she moulds and works the materials to show incredibly skilful works – and she’s been paid good money for them from all over the world.

It’s a testament to how good her work is that she says she is contacted online by people who simply don’t believe she is blind – and, if she is, that she can produce her art unaided.

Read my piece on the Mirror here.